October events for Solent Connexions

Do you look after or help support a family member, partner or friend because of their illness, disability or emotional distress? Are you feeling stressed, depressed or worried about this?

Why not join us during October for one of our weekly events to find out more about what kind of support Solent Connexions can offer?

On Thursday 7th October at 2pm, Sarah Haskett and Carolyn Barber will be live on our Facebook page with a Chit Chat Cafe event talking about the project.

Then on Thursday 14th October, there’s an online drop-in event from 3-4pm. An opportunity for any questions and to find out how you can get some support, you can join on Zoom using this link: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/99276216147?pwd=b1JvSm1KQTVMSmtvY3Z6SEl3TW15Zz09

Meeting ID: 992 7621 6147
Passcode: 775551

And on Thursday 21st October, we’re heading to Gosport for an in-person event from 2-4pm to introduce the Solent Connexions project to local people. Our meeting will be in partnership with Gosport Voluntary Action, so you’ll get to hear about the valuable support they offer too. Places at the GVA venue will be limited but you can also join the event via Zoom on this link:

https://us06web.zoom.us/j/83458523128?pwd=NitReEJFdG91MjBGZVRDUlp3VzJCZz09

Meeting ID: 834 5852 3128
Passcode: 806459

Stories of Asylum Exhibition

Join us at Gosport Heritage Open Days for an exhibition about how mental health care in Hampshire developed over the last century, based on research and memory sharing by local volunteers. You can also access a virtual exhibition that focuses on stories of local mental health care during WW1

Imposing Victorian buildings housed patients in the Hampshire County Lunatic Asylum (later Knowle Psychiatric Hospital) and the Borough of Portsmouth Lunatic Asylum (later St James’ Hospital). Royal Hospital Haslar and Netley Hospital, both important Ministry of Defence establishments, had their own psychiatric facilities.

The experiences of ‘shell shock’ by so many on the battlefields of WW1 initiated a transformation in approaches to mental health care, over time and with successive legislation.

The stories told through the displays and online show how this hidden part of our social history can raise awareness of changes and help to challenge the stigma around mental health at the present time.

Click here for more details of the exhibition which takes place from 13 – 18 September at the Gosport Gallery & Museum, Ordnance Road, Gosport, PO12 1NQ.

Click here to view the online exhibition, download a pamphlet about the exhibition and view online webinars on the history of local mental health care.

Help improve mental health services in Portsmouth

Creativity and wellbeing for women

“Why should we all use our creative power……?  Because there is nothing that makes people so generous, joyful, lively, bold and compassionate, so indifferent to fighting and the accumulation of objects and money” 
Brenda Ueland.

The Nexus Project is a new creative and wellbeing group for women, set up in partnership with the Independence and Wellbeing Team at Portsmouth City Council, and funded through the Tampon Tax Fund.

Caring Thru Covid

Do you know someone who looks after or supports a family member, partner or friend because of their illness, disability or emotional distress? Are they feeling stressed, worried or depressed about this?

Find out more at our online event on Monday 17 May at 11.30am

Join us online to find out more about Solent Connexions. Backed by Solent NHS Trust, this new virtual initiative is offering a dedicated online space where those who are looking after or supporting someone else can find support themselves with their own mental health and wellbeing. There’s befriending support via Zoom or telephone, group support sessions, and 1-1 sessions.

Discover Meaning and Values

“Ever more people today have the means to live, but no meaning to live for.” —Viktor Frankl
 

This is a quote from a psychiatrist called Viktor Frankl who wrote a book called Man’s Search for Meaning in 1946. He makes the case that those who deal best with the most challenging and difficult life circumstances are those who can find meaning and a sense of control over their environment. What makes his argument incredibly powerful is that he’s describing his own experience as a concentration camp inmate during the Second World War.

Reflections on Love, Loss and Covid 19

Waves of Loneliness

During the coronavirus outbreak we have all been through enormous change, and some of us are experiencing loss of different types. All of us have been affected one way or the other, through loss of personal freedoms, loss of income, loss of social connections, loss of health, loss of control, and sometimes the loss of someone we love.

The Mental Health Foundation says: 

“Whatever the loss, our mind and body will react to this change. Something or someone that was there before is no longer there. Something or someone we depended on as part of our lives has gone. There has been a change. This can shake our world, and how it does so, will depend on what has happened and what support we have in place to cope.” 

New Mental Wealth Academy programme

After the success of our online Mental Wealth Academy during the first lockdown, and thanks to funding from the National Lottery Community Fund, we’ve put together a new online programme for 2021, running from Feb-May! Open to all abilities. You might be a complete beginner looking to try out a new hobby, or want to connect with other like-minded people! We’re encouraging participants to take part in the live online sessions to get the most out of their experience, however catch up videos and extra resources will be available within most courses. Also new for 2021 is a dedicated community chat page for participants to engage, connect and socialise on throughout their course!

Spotlight on Carers

“An unpaid carer is anyone, including children and adults, who looks after a family member, partner or friend who needs help because of their illness, frailty, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction and cannot cope without their support.”

Nationally, it is thought that 4.5 million additional people have taken on caring for older, disabled or seriously ill relatives or friends since the Covid-19 pandemic started.

Reasons to be Cheerful

Some of you may recall the late great Ian Drury. “Reasons To Be Cheerful, Pt. 3” was released by Stiff Records in 1979 and reached number 3 in the UK singles chart. The link takes you to an inspiring live performance with the Blockheads in 2010.

As 2020 comes to an end, there are indeed reasons to be cheerful, quite apart from the vaccines on the way. Its been a really tough year and next year will be even tougher for many people, but we’ve also seen waves of unprecedented compassion and courage which should be celebrated and valued in the future. Local communities have rallied to help people in need, whether through isolation, poor health, financial difficulties or bereavement. The pandemic has highlighted those essential services we depend on for a semblance of normality, and the courage of those who keep them going often at risk to themselves and their families. Not only hospital and health care staff, but also teachers and social care workers, supermarket workers, delivery people, factory and farm workers, hospitality and public transport workers.